a new blog dedicated to better showcasing the incredible diversity in beauty and human experience,

using news, photos, and opinions, in this misrepresented section of the world

© 2014 @imjnyc

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armenianhighland:

Churches and monasteries of the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church.

Founded in
1st century by Saint Thaddeus the Apostle and Saint Bartholomew the Apostle but not recognized by the Kingdom of Armenia until 301 A.D when Christianity was adopted as the state religion of Armenia, making it the world’s oldest national church. Gregory the Illuminator was the first recognized Catholicos of the Holy Church.

Many of the monasteries were also important Armenian medieval universities, which contributed to the advancement of science, religion and philosophy, reproduction of books and development of miniature painting

(via pamukkaleprincess)

fastcompany:

When it comes to expressing their political dissent, young Egyptian protesters look to street art

(via pamukkaleprincess)

ramiblag:

The different styles of Palestinian traditional dress, by location.

ramiblag:

The different styles of Palestinian traditional dress, by location.

(via pamukkaleprincess)

theblundergames:

truthbeliever:

For Ibrahim, life was bleak.

Bedbound and paralyzed as the result of a car accident over half a year ago, he had not had a visitor from his family in months and was in desperate need of life-changing surgery that the Saudi Arabian could not afford.

Alone and isolated, there was not too much joy in Ibrahim’s life.

That was until he posted a tweet aimed at encouraging one of the few followers he had to come and visit as he lay paralysed in his bed.

With his tweet he hoped that at least one sympathetic person might hear his call and provide some much craved company for him.

What he did not expect was the social media storm that it would create.

Within one day Ibrahim’s tweet became the most retweeted message in Saudi Arabia’s Twitter history.

The hashtag #VisitIbrahim circulated through social media circles and within just 24 hours it had been retweeted over 200,000 times.

Not only that, but Ibrahim got a lot more than he bargained for when hundreds of people from all over Saudi Arabia came to visit him.

Clutching flowers, pizza and other gifts there were cues of hundreds of people outside the King Khalid University Hospital in the country’s capital Riyadh, all with the aim of meeting Saudi’s latest social media star.

The hospital became so busy that its officials had to put a temporary ban on all of its visitors as the number of people in the building was affecting the work of its staff.

Yet Ibrahim did not only benefit from the tweet in terms of footfall and flowers, so compelled were the Saudi Twitter community by Ibrahim’s story that they contributed financially towards the life-changing surgery Ibrahim dreamed of.

The surgery which would cost $130,000 and involve Ibrahim travelling to Germany was quickly covered by the generous donors from the oil rich middle-eastern country.

Pictures showing visitors posing, talking to and even feeding the paralyzed man were posted on Twitter.

It is now hoped a trip to Germany can be organised soon so that that Ibrahim can get the surgery he is so in need of.

The Independent

Alhamdulilah 3la ni3mat al islaam

beautiful

(Source: thebowspring, via pamukkaleprincess)

aishaalshabrawy:

Sinai, I love you.

(via pamukkaleprincess)

earthstory:

Vegetation of the Sinai
Just over a year ago, the European Space Agency launched the Proba-V satellite; a small box, only about a meter across that contains cameras and spectrometers designed to observe the Earth’s vegetation and how it changes.
This image of the Sinai Peninsula was taken by Proba-V and does an incredible job of illustrating the boundaries and setups of the vegetation in the area. Despite it being a desert, the satellite illustrates a variety of habitats.
The coasts in the southern portion are surrounded by mountains that create a habitat on the interior of the peninsula, possibly by trapping some rainfall in the interior. In the center of the peninsula you can make out a drainage pattern carrying water towards the northern coast, and the channels themselves are lit up likely due to high salt contents. Then, in the north, other, more barren areas appear at the edge of the image.
Just a really cool photo to look at and a good illustration of the ability of this satellite to distinguish various ecosystems from above.
-JBB
Image credit: ESAhttp://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/05/Sinai_Peninsula

earthstory:

Vegetation of the Sinai

Just over a year ago, the European Space Agency launched the Proba-V satellite; a small box, only about a meter across that contains cameras and spectrometers designed to observe the Earth’s vegetation and how it changes.

This image of the Sinai Peninsula was taken by Proba-V and does an incredible job of illustrating the boundaries and setups of the vegetation in the area. Despite it being a desert, the satellite illustrates a variety of habitats.

The coasts in the southern portion are surrounded by mountains that create a habitat on the interior of the peninsula, possibly by trapping some rainfall in the interior. In the center of the peninsula you can make out a drainage pattern carrying water towards the northern coast, and the channels themselves are lit up likely due to high salt contents. Then, in the north, other, more barren areas appear at the edge of the image.

Just a really cool photo to look at and a good illustration of the ability of this satellite to distinguish various ecosystems from above.

-JBB

Image credit: ESA
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/05/Sinai_Peninsula

(via pamukkaleprincess)

bisexualtransgirlsmellerbee asked:

The Jewish people are indigenous to the middle east and were forced out by the Romans. This is a fact. How can ending that diaspora be colonialist?

pamukkaleprincess:

how are settlement construction and the decimation of whole villages not colonialist? how is annexing territory outside of your borders not colonialist? how is coming into an already inhibited land against the wishes of and without collaboration and communication with the native peoples not colonialist? how is a minority european population liberating itself from imperial power protection (in this case britain) yet dispossessing the native population not colonialist? how do any of these not remind you of the us, australia, south africa? claims to historical homeland are the only difference, yet diaspora doesn’t, in any case, justify any of the many, many human rights and international law violations israel commits daily by existing in the manner that it does

sukforhonesty:

Asghar Farhadi’s About Elly

sukforhonesty:

Asghar Farhadi’s About Elly

(via pamukkaleprincess)

canonizedandotherwise:

Mary, Protector of Caucasus

canonizedandotherwise:

Mary, Protector of Caucasus

(via pamukkaleprincess)

manifest05:

The Al-Shahid Monument in Baghdad by Wajdan Maher in 1983. The monument is built to resemble the characteristic blue domes that adorn the cityscape of Baghdad and represents the national pride of Iraq. It consist of a 40 meter dome cut in half and placed to form an”S” shape. Under the monument is a cultural complex that comprises of a museum, a library, lecture halls, and an exhibition space.

(via pamukkaleprincess)

Derzor Çöllerinde, recorded by Vartan Shapazian (originally of Kharpert, emigrated to U.S. in 1907) in 1939 in Fresno, California. 

Derzor çöllerinde yaralı çoktur/In the deserts of Der el-Zor, many are wounded
Gelme doktor gelme çarası yoktur/Don’t come, doctor, don’t come, there is no use
Bir Allah´tan gayrı hiç kimsem yoktur/Beside God, we have no one at all
Dininin uğruna giden Ermeni/Because of their faith, the Armenians go. 

Derzor çöllerinde bayıldım kaldım/In the deserts of Der el-Zor, I fainted and could not arise 
Harçlığım tükendi, evladım sattım/I’ve run out of money, I’ve sold off my child
Ana ben bu candan bıktım usandım/Oh mother, I’m sick and tired of this life
Millet uğruna giden Ermeni/Because of their race, the Armenians go.

Koyver ana koyver gideyim çöle/Let go, mother, let go, let me go off into the desert.
Kollarım çıpçıplak Araba köle/My bare arms are slave to the Arab
Söylensin destanım dillerden dillere/Let my story be told from tongue to tongue
Evlat uğruna giden Ermeni/Because of their children, the Armenians go.

This genocide-era lamentation was also recorded by Vahan Boyajian in New York  on his own “Bilbil” (Bulbul, “nightingale”) record label. He recorded the song with the title “Derzor Desdaanacı” (Der el-Zor’s Teller of Epics), accompanied by oud and violin. Vahan recorded several other songs, all, it seems, in Turkish. Vartan and his wife, Siranoosh, also recorded several Armenian-language folk songs. 

The song laments the death marches of the Armenians out of eastern Anatolia to the killing fields and mass graves of the Der el-Zor desert in Syria. The substance, melody, and context out of which the lamentation arose are enough to make this song haunting. But to think that Turkish was the language of lamentation for Armenians who were dying at the hands of Turks because that was likely the only language they knew well enough to sing in—that guts me. More here on Turkish language genocide-era songs and lamentations. 

(Source: chotai, via pamukkaleprincess)

divaneee:

Sosis (via Pin von Tami Stucki auf „World Colors“ | Pinterest)